Author Archives: emilianobruner

Base and vault

A study on covariation between parietal bone and endocranial base …

[post]    [paper]


Annapaola

New member of the lab! Annapaola Fedato did her master thesis on cognitive archaeology and visuospatial integration in our laboratory, as a student from the University of Padua (Italy). And now she will keep on working on the same issue with a PhD grant, dealing with experimental archaeology, affordance, and hand-tool relationships. About this topic, here a perspective paper on visuospatial integration and human evolution, and a review on visuospatial behaviours and fossil evidence. Because this blog deals mainly with brain and skull anatomy, she will be in charge of posting news and information on those brain areas involved in visuospatial functions. Welcome! [Affiliation Info]


Craniovascular traits

This month we have published a review on craniovascular traits and anthropology, freely available to download from the Journal of Anthropological Sciences. The article describes many vascular traits that can be analyzed on skulls, through the traces they leave on the bone surface or within the bone itself. The traces of the middle meningeal vessels, the traces of the venous sinuses, the diploic channels, and the endocranial foramina, can provide information on the vascular networks and, indirectly, on the physiological processes associated with their growth and development. The functional information available from these imprints is partial and incomplete, but it is the only one we have on blood flow when dealing with fossils, archaeological remains, or forensic cases. Methods are an issue, because of the difficulties with small samples, scoring procedure, statistics of ordinal and nominal variables, and with an intrinsic limitation in current anatomy: we still ignore the variations and processes behind many macroanatomical features, even in our own species. Previous articles on this topic deal with middle meningeal artery, vessels and thermoregulation, diploic channels, and parietal bone vascularization. Most of these papers are part of a project funded by the Wenner-Gren Foundation through an International Collaborative Research Grant, entitled “Cranial anatomy, anthropology, and the vascular system”. This beautiful drawing of a sectioned skull is by Eduardo Saiz.


Primates 2017

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Anatomists on the Edge

 

Anatomists on the Edge
27-29 June, 2017
Galway, Ireland

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Frontal lobes and surface

 

beaudet-and-bruner-2017A surface analysis on the frontal lobes in archaic humans …

[A post]    [The Paper]

 

 


A frontal sphere

bulut-et-al-2016So far, the majority of new quantitative methods and approaches to investigate sexual dimorphism have focused primarily on the morphology of the five most commonly studied sexually dimorphic traits of the skull (glabella, orbital margins, mastoid process, nuchal crest, and mental eminence), while other cranial traits are still being evaluated in terms of simple subjective descriptions. One of the cranial regions showing great potential for further development of sex estimation techniques is the frontal region. Recently, Bulut and colleagues quantified the shape differences between male and female frontal bones using a novel and landmark-free 3D modeling method. Their new finding that the male frontal bone is actually more spherical than the female is in opposition to the common perception. In their study, CT scans of 80 male and 80 female Caucasian frontal bones from a Turkish population between the age of 25 and 40 years were obtained. The frontal bone was isolated by carrying out the “selection tool” in the GOM Inspect software using STL models. The frontal bone model is aligned to the CAD sphere model, using the best-fit registration method in the GOM Inspect software. Next, the difference in surface morphology between the frontal bone data and the CAD sphere was quantified, using the sphere model as the reference surface. Also, color maps were generated to show the deviations between frontal bone surface and the CAD sphere surface. Deviations of ±1mm were calculated as the overlapping areas. Color maps show that, for males, the areas exhibiting the largest discrepancy between frontal bone and CAD sphere surface are glabella, the supraorbital margins, the zygomatic processes, the superciliary arc, and the temporal face.

The area displaying most overlap with the sphere is the upper frontal region, including the frontal squama and the frontal eminences. For females, the frontal squama showed the main congruence with the sphere surface, while the largest deviations were observed for glabella, the supraorbital margins, the zygomatic processes, the superciliary arch, the frontal eminences, and the temporal face. The amount of frontal bone overlapping with the sphere was found to range from 30.1% to 56.1% for males, and from 19.6% to 48.3% for females. The difference in average values between males (43.2 ± 6.5%) and females (33.9 ± 6.6%) was found to be statistically significant, i.e. p < 0.0001, using the double-sided version of student’s t-test. This finding is in opposition to the common perception that the male frontal bone is more inclined than the female, which is described as more vertical and rounded, convex, smooth, and broad. Using the overlapping surface parameter to develop linear discriminant functions, sex was accurately predicted for 61 of 80 females (76.3%) and 63 of 80 males (78.8%) after leave-one-out cross-validation, yielding an average of 77.5% correct classifications.

Yameng Zhang


Fractal brains

the-fractal-geometry-of-the-brain

[click here!]


Evolution of Nervous Systems II

ens2017

[Elsevier]   [Science Direct]


Xiutecuhlti

Xiutecuhlti

Mask of Xiutecuhlti, god of fire; 1325-1521 CE, Aztec-Mixtec, Mexico

[Museum of Artifacts]