Category Archives: Anatomy

Craniovascular traits

This month we have published a review on craniovascular traits and anthropology, freely available to download from the Journal of Anthropological Sciences. The article describes many vascular traits that can be analyzed on skulls, through the traces they leave on the bone surface or within the bone itself. The traces of the middle meningeal vessels, the traces of the venous sinuses, the diploic channels, and the endocranial foramina, can provide information on the vascular networks and, indirectly, on the physiological processes associated with their growth and development. The functional information available from these imprints is partial and incomplete, but it is the only one we have on blood flow when dealing with fossils, archaeological remains, or forensic cases. Methods are an issue, because of the difficulties with small samples, scoring procedure, statistics of ordinal and nominal variables, and with an intrinsic limitation in current anatomy: we still ignore the variations and processes behind many macroanatomical features, even in our own species. Previous articles on this topic deal with middle meningeal artery, vessels and thermoregulation, diploic channels, and parietal bone vascularization. Most of these papers are part of a project funded by the Wenner-Gren Foundation through an International Collaborative Research Grant, entitled “Cranial anatomy, anthropology, and the vascular system”. This beautiful drawing of a sectioned skull is by Eduardo Saiz.


Structural MRI artifacts

Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is a valuable and increasingly used method for studying brain anatomy as it allows large-scale, high-quality in vivo analyses. However, some artifacts might influence the digital results, and thus require cautious interpretation. In a recent review, these issues are addressed along with possible solutions. First, we need to keep in mind that the images acquired are not mere photographs of the brain, but reflect some biophysical properties of the tissues, by measuring the radio-frequency signals emitted by hydrogen atoms (present in water and fat) after being excited by magnetic waves. Thus, MRI is an indirect analysis of the brain anatomy and depends greatly on specific tissue properties. Second, researchers can choose from a variety of methods, depending on the aim of the survey. Macrostructure, i.e. the size and shape across voxels, can be studied through manual volumetry or automatic segmentation, voxel- or deformation-based morphometry, surface- based algorithms, or diffusion tractography. Microstructure, i.e. within-voxel contents, is usually analyzed through diffusion MRI, but also magnetization transfer imaging, or quantitative susceptibility mapping.

When making inferences on the biological significance of the outputs, the researcher must account for the possible digital artifacts. These can occur both during image acquisition and processing and can be subject-related and methodological-related. A common problem is subject motion, which might contaminate or influence the results, as the amount of motion varies with other factors influencing brain changes (age, sex, and disease status), or can even correlate with a specific effect being studied. For instance, motion induces gray matter reduction, which might be perceived as brain atrophy. Subject motion is unavoidable, but its influence can be reduced by using a motion detector during acquisition, or by estimating the amount of motion allowing statistical adjustments, also useful to  detect outliers. The difficulty in manipulating the magnetic and radio-frequency fields might also introduce deformation. The main magnetic field should be spatially uniform, but it is dispersed by brain tissue while concentrated by air. This can be partially compensated by applying additional fields. The radiofrequency field is not homogeneous, which affects MRI contrast and intensity. Combining multiple transmit coils might help reduce this caveat, although the contribution and sensitivity of each coil must be taken into account when processing the image.

A particular case that can affect estimates of cortical volume and thickness is the difficulty in discriminating the dura and gray matter due to the similar intensity and anatomical proximity. In this case,  MRI parameters can be manipulated in order to increase the contrast between these tissues, without reducing the contrast between gray and white matter. Individual variability in folding patterns is a further major issue in voxel-based morphometry studies because it complicates the mapping of correspondences between subjects. Registration might be enhanced by analyzing regions with larger variation to find possible anatomical alterations, aligning cortical folding patterns to locate corresponding areas, and mapping sulcal changes to improve sulci identification. Finally, researchers should continuously keep track of the constant advances and innovations in the field. The authors conclude acknowledging the importance of structural MRI when coupled with other biological information, like genetic expression (Allen Brain Atlas), cytoarchitecture (JuBrain), and cognitive associations (Neurosynth).

Sofia Pedro


Anatomists on the Edge

 

Anatomists on the Edge
27-29 June, 2017
Galway, Ireland

[Home]


Frontal lobes and surface

 

beaudet-and-bruner-2017A surface analysis on the frontal lobes in archaic humans …

[A post]    [The Paper]

 

 


Mapping the brain

The Rhoton Collection is composed by an outstanding anatomical presentations of the brain created by the renowned surgeon and educator Dr. Albert Rhoton Jr throughout his life. These presentations were made using bright blue and red dyes in the blood vessels, so that surgeons could easily visualize and explore the brain and vascular structures for planning surgical interventions.

[Here a post in Spanish]

Gizéh Rangel de Lázaro


Face and cranial base

neauxDimitri Neaux and colleagues have published a series of comprehensive analyses on the influence of the cranial base in facial morphology of humans and apes. In one of the papers, they assessed the integration between the face and the two basicranial modules: the sagittal and the lateral cranial base. They tested the covariation between the three sets of 3D landmarks (face vs. midline base and face vs. lateral base) on modern humans and chimpanzees, separately. Only the correlation between the face and the lateral cranial base was significant, confirming the important role of the lateral cranial base in facial morphology. Though the levels of covariation were comparable, the patterns differed between the two species, as taller faces were associated with wider and shorter cranial fossae in chimps and with longer and narrower cranial fossae in humans. In another article, they assessed the relationship between cranial base flexion, facial orientation, and facial shape in modern humans, chimpanzees, and gorillas. Using 3D landmark analysis, they evaluated the within-species patterns of covariation, confirming the intraspecific relationship between facial structures and base flexion. Base flexion is associated with downward rotation of the facial block in both humans and chimps (confirming previous works) but not in gorillas. On the other hand, an upward rotation of the facial block is associated with anterior face vertical elongation on the three species. In humans, facial elongation is also associated with base flexion, which might have been selected during evolution to match the elongation of the nasomaxillary complex, as proposed before. The authors further tested whether increased base flexion is associated with the shortening of the facial length or with the decrease of facial projection. The relationship between base flexion and facial length was only observed in chimps, while facial projection was not related with cranial base flexion in chimpanzees and gorillas. In humans, contrary to what was expected, basicranial flexion was associated with increasing facial projection, which the authors attribute to sexual dimorphism, as males have increased base flexion and facial projection. Again, the main patterns of correlation differed between the species. Cranial base angle is negatively correlated with facial projection in modern humans, with facial length in chimps, and with the angle between the posterior-maxillary plane and the anterior facial plane in gorillas. As the authors conclude, these differences in the patterns of integration might reflect changes in the structural relationships between the face and the cranial base during hominoid evolution.

Sofia Pedro


Carotid Artery and Primate Encephalisation

lemur-ica-editIn general, members of the Primate Order possess larger brains for body size than other mammals, with modern humans (Homo sapiens) evolving the largest brains. The Internal Carotid Artery (ICA) provides blood supply to the brain but there are distinct anatomical differences between the primate groups. While vascular and other soft-tissues are very rarely fossilised, evidence of the ICA passage is retained where it was encapsulated in bony tubes or as distinct grooves of the endocranial surface. The ICA evolved in primates from two main pathways in the auditory complex: the promontory artery branched from the cochlear space to supply blood to the brain while the stapedial artery branched from the obturator foramen of the stapes to provide blood to the cerebral meninges and the orbito-facial complex. Primate groups are recognised by ICA anatomy: Within the Strepsirrhini, Lorisiformes and Cheirogaleids both lack the stapedial and promontory arteries with the External Carotid Artery (ECA) supplying blood to the brain instead of the ICA; whereas, non-Cheirogaleids possess the ICA and stapedial artery but often retain a much smaller promontory artery, while the anthropoids (apes and monkeys) lack the stapedial artery entirely retaining only the promontory artery.

The evolution of these distinct differences was examined by comparing living and fossil primates and reconstructing the hypothetical phylogenetic pathways. The size differences between the stapedial and promontory arteries were compared to endocranial volume (ECV) to investigate the influence on brain size. Only the size of the promontory artery had a consistent correlation with brain size. There was no reported correlation between brain size and size of the stapedial artery, with the stapedial only correlating with size of the promontory artery. This suggests that throughout primate evolution, the trend for body and brain size increases caused the stapedial artery to become restricted as head size increased but size of the obturator foramen did not scale equally with the head. Most early primates evolved a reduction in the size of the stapedial artery and quickly accommodated an increase in the promontory artery allowing even greater blood flow to the brain and driving the encephalisation process and the eventual loss of the stapedial artery in anthropoids.

Alannah Pearson


Unfixed brain

A bit splatter …

“In this teaching video, Suzanne Stensaas, Ph.D., Professor of Neurobiology and Anatomy at the University of Utah School of Medicine, demonstrates the properties and anatomy of an unfixed brain. WARNING: The video contains graphic images, a human brain from a recent autopsy. Background noise is unrelated to this brain or the deceased. There are two purposes for this video: 1) to stress the vulnerability of the brain to highlight the importance of wearing helmets, seat belts, and taking care of this very precious tissue, and 2) to use as a teaching aid for students who only have access to fixed tissue, models, and pictures.” (University of Utah Neuroscience Initiative).


Hyena paleoneurology

hyenasA series of works by Sharleen T. Sakai’s group have correlated the proportions of the anterior endocranial region with social behaviour in hyenas. They found that in spotted hyenas (Crocuta crocuta), males have relatively larger anterior cerebrum than females. The relative volume of the anterior endocranial region is also significantly larger in this species when compared to other extant species of hyenas. The spotted hyenas are the most gregarious species, living in large clans, where females are dominant and philopatric, and males disperse and must adapt to the hierarchic system of a new clan. The anterior region of the hyena’s brain comprises mostly the frontal cortex, which mediates social behaviour. The authors hypothesize, in the light of the social brain hypothesis, that the development of the frontal region in this species, and particularly in males, might have been enhanced by the need for a larger behavioural flexibility in their complex social environment. More recently, Joan Madurell-Malapeira and his colleagues compared the endocasts of two extinct spotted hyenas (C. spelaea and C. ultima) with those of extant species. The fossil specimens have similar morphology to that of C. crocuta, but less developed anterior portion of their endocranium. The authors therefore propose this feature to be an autapomorphy of C. crocuta. Consequently, the social and foraging behaviour of these fossil species are presumably less specialized, and this might contradict some speculations about competition between hyenas and humans during Pleistocene.

Sofia Pedro


Cranial thickness

estimation-of-skull-table-thicknessThe cranial vault is composed by three bone layers (inner table, diploe, outer table), and its principal function is to safeguard the brain from impacts. Bone thickness is a crucial parameter to understand the biomechanical factors contributing to skull deformations and fractures after head injury. It is therefore  important to establish an accurate measurement system to quantify its variation. Lillie et al., 2015 analyzed microCT scans of two cadavers to evaluate the accuracy of the estimated cortical thickness from clinical CT data. Microscans were acquired at 25-microns, while CT scans had a resolution of 0.48-0.62 mm. The skull average thickness in both cases was below 4 mm. Cortical thickness measurements obtained from CT scans are more accurate compared with traditional physical methods, although results are comparable with those available in literature. The average cortical thickness discrepancy between microCT scans (higher resolution) and CT scans (lower resolution) is 0.078+ 0.58 mm. Such methodological validation is necessary when dealing with age-related changes in distribution of the skull cortical thickness, and to identify species-specific or population differences.

Gizéh Rangel de Lázaro