Category Archives: Images

Brain regional scaling

Reardon and colleagues recently published a study on the variation of human brain organization and its relationship with brain size. Using neuroimaging data from more than 3000 individuals they calculated the local surface area and estimated the areal scaling in relation to the total cortical area in order to generate a reference map for areal scaling in cortical and subcortical structures. By using three separate cohorts, three different platforms of image-acquisition, and two distinct imaging processing pipelines, they obtained the same results. Regions with positive scaling, i.e. which area increases with increasing total cortical size, were found with the prefrontal, lateral temporoparietal, and medial parietal cortices, whereas the limbic, primary visual, and primary somatosensory regions showed negative scaling. These patterns of cortical area distribution relatively to normative brain size variation were also reproduced at the individual level in terms of proportion, as, for instance, areas of positive scaling regions were positively correlated with the total cortical area. These patterns of areal scaling distribution are also comparable with patterns of brain expansion during human development and primate evolution (humans vs. macaques). In terms of cytoarchitecture, the regions of positive scaling were concentrated within association cortices, such as the default mode, dorsal attention, and frontoparietal networks, while the negative scaling regions were found within the limbic network. The association of areal scaling patterns with known patterns of mitochondria-related gene expression suggests these regions that are expanded in larger brains might differ in their metabolic profile. The authors concluded that the similarity of the areal scaling maps across development and evolution, and at the individual level, suggests a shared scaling gradient of the primate cortex. Larger brains tend to preferentially expand association cortex, specialized for integration of information, which might point to a need for an increase of the neural subtracts, such as dendrites or synapses, in order to maintain or enhance brain function in an expanded brain. Further study designs are required to investigate the relationship between cortical areal patterns and brain function.

Sofia Pedro

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Atapuerca 2018

 

Paleoneurology Lab at Atapuerca, July 2018


Top hat

[Gemma Suárez]


Polyphemus

Amazing document!
A cyclop’s skull …

(a new species? cyclopism? what about hybrids!?)

 

 


Xiutecuhlti

Xiutecuhlti

Mask of Xiutecuhlti, god of fire; 1325-1521 CE, Aztec-Mixtec, Mexico

[Museum of Artifacts]


Polychromic Mosaic Skull

polycromic-skull-mixtecaztec-1300-1521

Polychromic Mosaic Skull

Tessels of Turquoise, Hematite, Tumbaga and Gold Sheet

Mixtec/Aztec, Mexico, 1300-1521 A.D.


Brain Design

Emilio Garcia (Brain and Skull)Brain and Skull Art and Design at Emilio Garcia’s Webpage!

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Layers

Layers

Amazing image from High Tech Panda!

From right to left:

Scalp, Periosteum, Bone, Dura Mater, Arachnoid, Pia Mater, Brain


Precuneus: folding and metrics

Pereira-Pedro and Bruner 2016_1 This month we have published a study featuring the cortical extension and anatomy of the precuneus, dealing with its metrics as well as with its sulcal pattern. The analysis was based on a MRI sample of 50 adult humans from both sexes. Our previous works concerned the variation, position, and surface, as well as the phylogenetic differences in the midsagittal plane. Instead, in this survey metrics was assessed on the coronal plane, “cutting” the precuneus in its anterior, middle and posterior sections, taking into account its curvature. The lateral (inner) extension of the precuneus was measured along the subparietal sulcus and its height was measured from the subparietal sulcus to the endocranial wall. Then a set of 10 two dimensional landmarks were digitized on the middle section along the outline of the parietal lobe, to analyze the correlation between outer brain profile and inner precuneus dimensions. We found that, on average, the precuneus extends 14 mm laterally and 36 mm vertically. It is wider on the anterior and middle sections, and usually larger on the right hemisphere, possibly due to the length of the fold (surface area) rather than to the thickness of the grey matter. The precuneus height influences the outer brain morphology (vertical stretching), but the subparietal size apparently has no influence on the external outline. Therefore, at least the former trait could be investigated in paleoneurology, by indirect inference on the inner dimensions as evaluated through their external effects. The lateral (parasagittal) surface of the upper parietal lobules seems to be unrelated to the size of the precuneus. Therefore, when a change of these areas is detected (like in Neandertals) the intraparietal sulcus is a better candidate as the cortical element involved in the morphological variations.

Pereira-Pedro and Bruner 2016_2

The sulcal pattern was analyzed on the average density projection of the 5 most sagittal stacks (5 mm of the cortex), a thickness which displays most of the sulcal features. Three characteristics were taken into consideration: the connections of the subparietal sulcus, the connections of other sulci in the precuneus, and the general sulcal scheme. Some of these features have been analyzed in other surveys, but  the consideration of other folds beyond the subparietal one is specific of this study. Roughly half of the precuneus sulci that reach the external surface are not linked to the subparietal sulcus. Contrary to other studies which found higher frequencies of an H-like pattern of the subparietal sulcus, we found a larger proportion of an inverted-T pattern (subparietal sulcus connected with one precuneus sulcus). The differences between studies might be due to random effects of the samples, because of the relevant individual variability of these traits. The left hemisphere displays more sulci reaching the external surface while the right hemisphere displays deeper folding. The anterior area shows more sulcal complexity than the posterior one. There seems to be no relationship between the size of the subparietal sulcus and its folding pattern, and these characteristics might be hence influenced by genetics or folding biomechanics.

Sofia Pedro


Carving skulls

Tibetan carved skull

Tibetan carved skull