Tag Archives: 10-10 system

Cortical and scalp development

In a recent study, Tsuzuki and colleagues analysed the co-development of the brain and head surfaces during the first two years of life using a sample of 16 infant MRIs, aged from 3 to 22 months. First, they digitized a set of cortical landmarks defined by the major sulci. Then they determined the position of cranial landmarks according to the 10-10 system, a standard method to place electrodes for electroencephalography, using  nasion, inion, and the pre-auriculars as a reference. Besides analysing the spatial variability of the cortical and scalp landmarks with age, they compared the variability of the cortical landmarks to the 10-10 positions, in order to evaluate the validity of the scalp system as a reference for brain development. For that, they transferred a given cortical landmark to the head surface by expressing its position as a composition of vectors in reference to the midpoint between the two pre-auriculars and to the three neighbor 10-10 points. The scalp-transferred landmarks were then transformed to the scalp template of a 12-month-old infant and depicted in reference to the 10-10 system.

Age-related changes in the cortical landmarks were most obvious in the prefrontal and parietal regions. As the brain elongates, the frontal lobe shifts anteriorly and the precentral gyri widen. In addition, the intraparietal sulci and the posterior part of the left Sylvian fissure move forward, suggesting relative enlargement of the parietal region in the anterior direction. The same result was obtained by our team by analyzing cranial and brain landmarks in adults: larger brain size is associated with a relative forward position of the parietal lobe. The scalp showed relative anteroposterior elongation and lateral narrowing with growth. Regarding the contrast between the cortical landmarks and the 10-10 system, the authors observed that the variability in the position of the former was much smaller than the area defined by 10-10 landmarks, indicating this system can be useful to predict the underlying cortical structures. Hence, they conclude that the changes in brain shape during development are well described by cortical landmarks and that the relative scalp positioning based on the 10-10 system can adjust to preserve the correspondence between the scalp and the cortical surfaces.

 

Sofia Pedro

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