Tag Archives: cortical variation

Brain regional scaling

Reardon and colleagues recently published a study on the variation of human brain organization and its relationship with brain size. Using neuroimaging data from more than 3000 individuals they calculated the local surface area and estimated the areal scaling in relation to the total cortical area in order to generate a reference map for areal scaling in cortical and subcortical structures. By using three separate cohorts, three different platforms of image-acquisition, and two distinct imaging processing pipelines, they obtained the same results. Regions with positive scaling, i.e. which area increases with increasing total cortical size, were found with the prefrontal, lateral temporoparietal, and medial parietal cortices, whereas the limbic, primary visual, and primary somatosensory regions showed negative scaling. These patterns of cortical area distribution relatively to normative brain size variation were also reproduced at the individual level in terms of proportion, as, for instance, areas of positive scaling regions were positively correlated with the total cortical area. These patterns of areal scaling distribution are also comparable with patterns of brain expansion during human development and primate evolution (humans vs. macaques). In terms of cytoarchitecture, the regions of positive scaling were concentrated within association cortices, such as the default mode, dorsal attention, and frontoparietal networks, while the negative scaling regions were found within the limbic network. The association of areal scaling patterns with known patterns of mitochondria-related gene expression suggests these regions that are expanded in larger brains might differ in their metabolic profile. The authors concluded that the similarity of the areal scaling maps across development and evolution, and at the individual level, suggests a shared scaling gradient of the primate cortex. Larger brains tend to preferentially expand association cortex, specialized for integration of information, which might point to a need for an increase of the neural subtracts, such as dendrites or synapses, in order to maintain or enhance brain function in an expanded brain. Further study designs are required to investigate the relationship between cortical areal patterns and brain function.

Sofia Pedro

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Cortical morphology and ancestry

Fan et al 2015_2A recent study published by a large neuroscience team involved in imaging, cognition, and genetics, showed that cortical geometry is correlated with genetic ancestry. Using a sample of US citizens from the PING data, they reconstructed 3D cortical surfaces to obtain information on the morphological variation of the sulci and gyri. To calculate proportions of genetic ancestry they used as reference populations from west Africa, east Asia, a sample of native Americans and a sample of European descendants. The main finding of the study is that cortical folding patterns are strongly related to the genetic ancestry. According to the authors, African ancestry is associated with more posterior and narrower temporal areas. Frontal and occipital surfaces are more projected in Europeans and flatter in Native Americans. Asians have more variability in the temporal and parietal regions. Their results were similar to  Howells’ craniometric analysis. Moreover, all but Europeans display increased morphological variation in the posterolateral-temporal region. Due to these  morphological differences among populations, the authors warn for a possible methodological bias when mixing sample from different geographical origins in imaging studies.

Sofia Pedro